Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Are the Government trying to foment a revolution ? Ex-Forces community and serving soldiers mad with anger.

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'Bloody disgrace not Bloody Sunday!': Veterans' outrage as ex-Para is arrested on suspicion of murdering three marchers in Londonderry in 1972

  • Man detained in County Antrim by Legacy Investigation Branch officers
  • 66-year-old being interviewed by detectives at a police station in Belfast
  • Fourteen people died when British soldiers shot 26 unarmed civilians 
  • First arrest since police launched murder investigation into events in 2012

British military veterans have reacted with outrage to the arrest of a former paratrooper on suspicin of murdering three protesters on Bloody Sunday.
Police in Northern Ireland this morning announced that they had detained a 66-year-old man in County Antrim in relation to the Londonderry shootings in 1972.
He is currently being interviewed by detectives at a police station in Belfast after being lifted by detectives from the country's Legacy Investigation Branch.
An Injured protester caught up in the horror of Bloody Sunday is seen being carried by friends past soldiers. A former British soldier has been arrested by detectives investigating the shootings. The 66-year-old man was detained in County Antrim by detectives from Northern Ireland's Legacy Investigation Branch
An Injured protester caught up in the horror of Bloody Sunday is seen being carried by friends past soldiers. A former British soldier has been arrested by detectives investigating the shootings. The 66-year-old man was detained in County Antrim by detectives from Northern Ireland's Legacy Investigation Branch
It is understood the pensioner was arrested on suspicion of the murders of William Nash, 19, John Young, 17, and Michael McDaid, 20, all of whom were shot dead in close proximity to one another at a rubble barricade on Rossville Street.
The former soldier is also being questioned about the attempted murder of William Nash's father Alexander.
However, news of his arrest prompted an angry response from veterans and British military sympathisers.
Posters on the Parachute Regimental Association's Facebook site blasted the decision as 'a bloody disgrace', 'a betrayal of troops' and 'fundamentally wrong'.
They voiced their opinions angered at the so called 'hypocrisy' brought about by the fact 200 suspected IRA terrorists were given amnesty in the Good Friday agreement. 
Colonel Richard Kemp, a former commander of British forces in Afghanistan who served 8 tours in Northern Ireland in the 1980s and 1990s, told the Telegraph that the arrest was 'yet another example of this Government allowing British soldiers to be hounded through the courts'. 
It is understood the pensioner was arrested on suspicion of the murders of William Nash, 19, John Young, 17 (pictured), and Michael McDaid, 20
It is understood the pensioner was arrested on suspicion of the murders of William Nash, 19, John Young, 17 (pictured), and Michael McDaid, 20
He said: 'The spotlight, if anywhere, should fall upon the commanders, not just soldiers, and that includes some very, very senior officers.'
Colonel Kemp added that if the Government had released terrorists under the Good Friday peace agreement, then soldiers should also not face prosecution. 
No further details have been released as yet confirming the man's identity but local reports have confirmed he is a former member of the Parachute Regiment.  
Kate Nash, sister of 19-year-old William Nash, welcomed the development.
'We have always fought very hard to be treated equally within the justice system,' she said.
'I see this as a positive step.'
The former paratrooper's arrest is the first made by officers since their murder investigation into the events of Bloody Sunday was launched in 2012.
The probe was initiated after a Government-commissioned inquiry undertaken by Lord Saville found that none of the victims were posing a threat to soldiers when they were shot.
Democratic Unionist East Londonderry MP Gregory Campbell asked if all killings around the time of Bloody Sunday would now be investigated.
He said: 'It remains to be seen whether the current investigations will focus solely on the actions of soldiers on that day or whether progress will be made on arresting others who were engaged in illegal terrorist activity at the same time.
Posters on the Parachue Regimental Association Facebook site blasted the decision as 'a bloody disgrace', 'a betrayal of troops' and 'fundamentally wrong'
Posters on the Parachue Regimental Association Facebook site blasted the decision as 'a bloody disgrace', 'a betrayal of troops' and 'fundamentally wrong'
'Two police officers were in a patrol car on part of the route of the march three days before Bloody Sunday and were murdered by the Provisional IRA.
'The police need to confirm if they are questioning anyone in relation to that double murder or the other murders that occurred around the same time.
'Are they following any lines of inquiry against individuals who were not police or army personnel serving in Londonderry at that time?' 
Following the publication of the Saville report in 2010, Prime Minister David Cameron apologised for the Army's actions, branding them 'unjustified and unjustifiable'.
The 14 people who died were all men, aged between 17 and 41-years-old. A 59-year-old eventually succumbed to his injuries months later
The 14 people who died were all men, aged between 17 and 41-years-old. A 59-year-old eventually succumbed to his injuries months later

THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES WHEN BRITISH TROOPS OPENED FIRE

Patrick Doherty, 31: The married father of six was shot from behind as he attempted to crawl to safety from the forecourt of Rossville flats. The active civil rights campaigner died at the scene. A soldier who fired at him claimed he had been armed with a pistol, but a photograph of the factory worker taken moments before he was hit showed no evidence of a firearm.
Gerald Donaghey, 17: Intense controversy has surrounded the question of whether the IRA youth member was armed with nail bombs when he was shot in the abdomen while running between Glenfada Park and Abbey Park. Lord Saville said it was probable that he was in possession of the bombs, but he stressed that he was not preparing to throw one when he was shot.
John 'Jackie' Duddy, 17: The keen boxer was the first to be killed on Bloody Sunday. He was running away when he was shot in the chest in the car park of Rossville flats. Lord Saville said he probably had a stone in his hand at the time.
Hugh Gilmour, 17: The talented footballer and ardent Liverpool fan was hit with a single shot as he ran away from the rubble barricade on Rossville Street. A student nurse attempted to treat his wounds but he died at the scene. A solider who fired at him claimed he aimed at a man with a hand gun, but a photo taken of the stricken teenager moments after he fell showed no evidence of a weapon and witnesses insisted he was unarmed.
From left to right: Patrick Doherty, Bernard McGuigan and John 'Jackie' Duddy were shot and killed
From left to right: Patrick Doherty, Bernard McGuigan and John 'Jackie' Duddy were shot and killed
Michael Kelly, 17: The trainee sewing-machine mechanic was shot once in the abdomen close to the rubble barricade on Rossville Street by a soldier crouched some 80 yards away at Kells Walk. Lord Saville said a paratrooper had falsely claimed the teenager was a nail bomber.
Michael McDaid, 20: The barman died instantly after being shot in the face at the barricade on Rossville Street. The downward trajectory of the bullet entry wound led to claims he was shot by soldiers positioned on top of Derry's historic stone walls, which overlooked the scene. But Saville rejected that suggestion, insisting no one was shot from the walls.
Kevin McElhinney, 17: The grocery store worker was shot from behind as he crawled toward Rossville flats. Witnesses, including a Roman Catholic priest, claimed the rock and roll devotee was not armed.
Bernard 'Barney' McGuigan, 41: The father of six was going to the aid of Patrick Doherty, waving a white handkerchief in his hand, when he was shot in the head with a single round. He died instantly.
From left to right: Gerard McKinney, Jim Wray, William McKinney and John Young all lost their lives
From left to right: Gerard McKinney, Jim Wray, William McKinney and John Young all lost their lives
Gerard McKinney, 35: The father of eight was running close behind Gerald Donaghey in Abbey Park when the bullet that killed both of them hit him first. The bullet passed sideways through his body but did not wound either arm, indicating that his hands were possibly raised at the time.
William 'Willie' McKinney, 27 (not related to Gerard): The keen amateur film-maker recorded scenes from the march with his hand-held cinecamera before the shooting started. The camera was found in his jacket pocket as he lay dying after being shot in the back in Glenfada Park.
William Nash, 19: The dockworker was struck by a single bullet to the chest close to the rubble barricade on Rossville Street. Witnesses said he was unarmed, but an initial Government inquiry into the shootings, the much-criticised Widgery Tribunal, claimed he had probably been firing a gun. Saville rejected both this assertion and soldiers' claims that those they shot at the barricade had either nail bombs or guns.
James Wray, 22: Engaged to be married, the civil rights activist was shot twice in the back in Glenfada Park. The second shot was fired as he lay mortally wounded on the ground.
John Young, 17: The menswear shop clerk was killed instantly with a single shot to the head at the rubble barricade. Based on lead particles allegedly found on his left hand, Widgery found that he had probably fired a gun. Saville rejected this finding, concurring with witnesses who insisted he was unarmed.
John Johnston, 59: The draper was shot twice by soldiers positioned inside a derelict building in William Street. He died four months later in hospital. This incident took place about 15 minutes before the main shootings and at a location away from the other killings. The soldiers who fired were targeting 15-year-old Damien Donaghy, who was struck in the thigh.
In September, the Police Service Northern Ireland (PSNI) announced their intention to interview seven former soldiers about their involvement on the day. 
Detective Chief Inspector Ian Harrison is leading the investigation.
He said the arrest 'marked a new phase in the overall investigation which would continue for some time'.
The 1972 slaughter saw 14 Catholic civil rights protesters shot dead during a march through Londonderry.
Ten thousand marchers saw their planned route to Guildhall Square in the heart of the city sealed off by British troops.
However, a handful - mostly teenagers - tried to persist with the original walk, clashing with police officers at whom they threw stones.
Former MP Peter Hain (pictured), who was Secretary of State for Northern Ireland between 2005 and 2007, previously stated that he believes the British troops involved in the killings should be given an amnesty from prosecution as terrorists have been
Former MP Peter Hain (pictured), who was Secretary of State for Northern Ireland between 2005 and 2007, previously stated that he believes the British troops involved in the killings should be given an amnesty from prosecution as terrorists have been
Police responded by firing water canons and rubber bullets.
However, the 1st Parachute Regiment, who were also on patrol, were quickly called into action.
Some of the paratroopers then almost immediately opened fire, killing thirteen men and injuring 13 others, one of whom died some months later.  
The 14 people who died were all men, aged between 17 and 41-years-old. A 59-year-old eventually succumbed to his injuries months later.

PROSECUTION TO PROCEED INTO ARMY SHOOTING 41 YEARS AGO

The prosecution of a former soldier accused of the attempted murder of a man with learning difficulties over 40 years ago will go ahead, a judge in Northern Ireland has heard.
John-Pat Cunningham, 27, was shot dead by an Army patrol in June 1974.
A public prosecutor told Armagh Magistrates' Court that the case against Dennis Hutchings, 74, from Cawsand, Torpoint in Cornwall, would be heard.
John-Pat Cunningham, 27, was shot dead by an Army patrol in June 1974
John-Pat Cunningham, 27, was shot dead by an Army patrol in June 1974
A preliminary inquiry had been scheduled for December 15 but the Public Prosecution Service (PPS) said that date could no longer be met.  
Hutchings, who is not accused of the murder, was originally charged by detectives in April. It was a holding charge that was subject to review by the PPS. 
PPS assistant director Michael Agnew said: 'The PPS has carried out a careful examination of all of the available evidence and information in this case. We have concluded that there is a reasonable prospect of conviction and that the test for prosecution is met. '
Mr Cunningham, who had the mental age of a child between six and 10, had a fear of men in uniform and was running away from an Army patrol when he was killed close to Benburb. The Government apologised for his death two years ago, into which a new investigation iwas launched in 2013.
Twelve others were injured, with more than 100 rounds fired into the crowd during the altercation.
The Police Service of Northern Ireland's Legacy Investigation Branch contains 70 officers probing historical murder cases, including Bloody Sunday.
At the time of its formation in December last year, Chief Constable George Hamilton said: 'In the continued absence of an agreed political and societal response to Northern Ireland's past, the Police Service plans to fulfil its statutory obligations through a new Legacy Investigation Branch.
'The formation of this Branch will ensure that we fulfil these legal obligations in terms of reviewing and investigating the past. It is our intention that it will be integrated into Crime Operations Department and will be accountable to me, under the direction of the Assistant Chief Constable for Crime Operations, Will Kerr.'
The PSNI has already contacted more than 100 soldiers as part of their investigation into the atrocity.
No soldiers are obliged to speak to the police because they are being treated as witnesses and not suspects.
Speaking in June, Detective Chief Inspector Harrison said: 'The next stage of the investigation would be to interview those soldiers who are willing to engage with the enquiry team as witnesses. 
'I am content with the level of resources I have working on the investigation at this stage.
'If at any time further resources are required they will be made available to me.'
Former MP Peter Hain, who was Secretary of State for Northern Ireland between 2005 and 2007, previously stated that he believes the British troops involved in the killings should be given an amnesty from prosecution as terrorists have been.
Mr Hain spoke out in March last year after it emerged that nearly 200 suspected IRA terrorists had received 'comfort letters' assuring them they were no longer being sought by police.
An Old Bailey judge ruled that John Downey would not be prosecuted for the 1982 Hyde Park terror blast, which left four soldiers dead, because he had effectively been given immunity as part of the peace process.
He said: 'Difficult as I know it is for victims on all sides, I see no point in endlessly searching for evidence for crimes committed so many years ago in the Troubles and which is increasingly difficult, if not impossible, to get given the passage of time.
'If you have addressed the question of former terrorists involved in activity, then it should apply even-handedly right across the board to members of the British security forces as well.'  
Sinn Fein Assembly member for Foyle, Raymond McCartney, today said the ex-soldier's arrest was a 'step forward'.
'This is another step forward in the long campaign for justice by the Bloody Sunday families,' he said.
'I would call on the PSNI to ensure the relatives are kept up to date of all developments on the investigations.'
NWN: What with the Sgt Blackman life sentence and the promise of many more arrests for this 'Bloody Sunday' fiasco. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Bringing in more and more immigrants . Imposing constant austerity cuts. They are destroying the UK and everything we revere and hold dear to us !

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