Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Dad and sons battered Good Samaritan brothers in brutal road-rage hammer attack - but not jailed !


Javed Akhtar

A father and his sons battered two brothers with a hammer in a terrifying road-rage attack.
Police were called to reports of a large group of men fighting in a street in Rochdale in July last year.
The attack was sparked after brothers Ghulam Hussain and Shamash Hussain stopped their car on Salkeld Street in Deeplish to help a friend.
Javed Akhtar, 50, pulled up behind the vehicle with his wife in his silver Nissan Micra.
He then began beeping his horn and claiming they were blocking the road, Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court heard.
Rachel Widdicombe, prosecuting, said: “Javed Akthar continued to swear. He started to get out, but his wife was trying to keep him in.
“He was getting more and more angry. He said he would be back in five minutes, got back in his car and drove off.”
A short time later, the victims were confronted by Javid Akhtar and a gang of between 10 and 15 men in nearby Salik Gardens.
Javid Akhtar was carrying a small wooden hammer, which he pointed at the two victims before the gang attacked.
In his police interview, Ghulam Hussain said he saw a flash of silver and was struck on the face near his right eyebrow, causing it to bleed.

Junaid Akhtar
 He was struggling to see and fell to the ground, where he was kicked and punched by the gang.
Shamash Hussain tried to help his brother and ran towards the group before rugby tackling some of the men to the ground.
He was then also attacked and hit across the nose with a hammer.
Witnesses called police and both men were taken to hospital, suffering cuts and bruises to their faces.
Javed Akhtar and his sons Junaid Akhtar, 22, Jamshed Akhtar, 20, and Bilal Mohammed, 19, were all arrested at their home in Salik Gardens.
Police seized the silver Nissan Micra and discovered blood inside the passenger door, which matched that of the victims.

Jamshed Akhtar
 Sentencing the men, Judge Leslie Hull said: “There was some sort of dispute, which arose from a vehicle disagreement and that led all too quickly and dramatically to the violent behaviour used.”
While on bail, Mohammed carried out a further attack in April this year using a broom handle to attack Waqaas Javed.
After repeatedly hitting Mr Javed in the face through the open window of his car, he used the broom handle to smash the rear window.
Referring to the second assault involving Mohammed, the judge added: “Bilal Mohammed, when you again got involved in a dispute, this time you took a stick and hit your victim fanatically. The injuries were not as bad as they might have been.
“But to add insult to injury you then smashed his car.”
All defendants pleaded guilty to affray and were each given 36-week prison sentences suspended for 12 months, plus 180 hours of unpaid work and £150 costs.
Mohammed also pleaded guilty to separate charges of common assault and criminal damage and was given an additional curfew, 12-month supervision order and ordered to attend an achieving peaceful solutions course.
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/father-sons-battered-brothers-hammer-8171366

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Franco and Jose Antonio rallies and demonstrations this weekend especially in Madrid


The above demonstration is being held in Alicante where Jose Antonio was murdered by the communist gangsters of the Spanish Civil War 1936 - 1939.

Below is another demonstration held in central Madrid this weekend outside the home where Jose Antonio was born on Calle Genova near Plaza Colon.When after a rally a march will commence up to Moncloa where a number of falange will march with a wreath to the Valle de los Caidos in the mountains outside Madrid.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Named and shamed: Six men who were banned from approaching girls under 18 amid fears of grooming are allowed to be identified

  • Men from Birmingham are Omar Ahmed, 27, Sajid Hussain, 40, Mohammed Anjam, 31, Naseem Khan, 30, Mohammed Javed, 33, and Alam Shah, 36
  • They have been banned from approaching any girl under age of 18
  • High Court heard three of them found in hotel with girl in care, 17
  • Landmark ruling is despite police not having enough evidence to convict 
  • Yet police refuse to release the men's photos - to protect their families
Six men have been named, shamed and barred from contacting underage girls in a landmark anti-exploitation case - despite there not being enough evidence to convict them of a crime.
The injunction was won by authorities in Birmingham today against the six men - three of whom were found with a 'vulnerable' girl in a hotel room.
They can be named as Omar Ahmed, 27, Sajid Hussain, 40, Mohammed Anjam, 31, Naseem Khan, 30, Mohammed Javed, 33, and Alam Shah, 36, after a judge ruled it was in the public interest for their identities to be released.
That was despite the objections of West Midlands Police - who despite applying for the injunction, argued the men's names should be kept secret to protect their private lives.
From left to right: Naseem Khan, Mohammed Javed and Allam Shah pictured outside London's High Court
The men were barred from contacting underage girls in a landmark anti-exploitation case in Birmingham
Even though the men have now been named, the force says it will not be releasing their photographs for the same reason.
A spokesman said: 'We have a duty to consider the impact of releasing the men's images on innocent family members, such as their partners and their own young children.' 
The men's names were released by Mr Justice Keehan at the High Court in London today after an application by journalists, who argued the public had a right to know.
He said his decision took into account it was 'their own reprehensible conduct which has led them into this position.'
All six had been hit with injunctions after applications by Birmingham City Council and West Midlands Police.
The injunctions bar them from contacting, approaching or following the girl and from approaching 'any female under the age of 18 years, not previously associated with him, on a public highway, common land, wasteland, parkland, playing field, public transport stop or station.' 
They must also not allow any female under the age of 18 not previously known to them 'to enter into or remain in any private motor car or taxi in which he is driving or travelling as a passenger.'
They were also banned from texting or contacting the girl by any means including 'face to face contact, telephone (mobile/landline/facetime/skype etc), text messages, msm, blackberry, chatrooms, or other social media'.
All six men were hit with injunctions after applications by Birmingham City Council and West Midlands Police
Landmark ruling: The names of the six men were released today at the High Court in London 
Landmark ruling: The names of the six men were released today at the Royal Courts of Justice in London
And they are forbidden from passing on details for the girl, 'for example name, location, address, telephone numbers' or 'incite, encourage or facilitate the introduction of the (the girl) to any other male.'
If the injunctions are broken, the men could be jailed for up to two years for contempt of court. 
One of the men said the proceedings were 'racist' as he left court today. 
It came after social workers and police raised concerns about the welfare of a vulnerable 17-year-old girl, who was in the care of the local authority.
According to the council the girl went missing from care a shocking 102 times since July 2010, when she was just 13.
Between August and October this year the girl, now aged 17, was taken to various hotels around Birmingham where she was sexually exploited.
After the council's intervention the girl, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was taken to a secure location for her own safety.
Javed, from Tyseley,  Khan, from Bordesley Green, and Shah, from Small Heath, claimed they were doing nothing wrong when police found them in a room at the Ibis Hotel in Birmingham with the teenager.
Named and shamed: Mr Justice Keehan ruled the public had the right to know the six men's names
Named and shamed: Mr Justice Keehan ruled the public had the right to know the six men's names
Javed claimed he met the girl at petrol station in August, and was drunk so he took her to the hotel room back and paid £40 in cash for the room.
He said nothing inappropriate happened, although they were both drinking vodka. He then said he called his friends Khan and Shah to take him home.
But the judge said Javed's evidence was 'incredible' and he was 'plainly lying.' He said the other two who claimed to have gone to the hotel to take him home as a friend were also lying.
He said: 'I am satisfied all three of them were engaged in the sexual exploitation of the girl.' 
He said Javed either had been engaged in sexual activity with her, or was planning her sexual exploitation, and brought the other two men to the hotel room to have sex with her.
Lorna Meyer QC, for Birmingham City Council, said the council and police had identified a 'number of individuals' found to be 'inappropriately' in the company of the 17-year-old girl.
Lawyers thought that there was not enough evidence to secure criminal convictions - on a beyond reasonable doubt basis - 'at the current time'.
But they thought that there was enough evidence to obtain civil court injunctions, which rely on the less strenuous test of the balance of probabilities. 
The first injunctions were granted on a temporary basis last month.
Permanent orders against Anjam, from Aston, and Ahmed, from Yardley, were secured on Monday.
Secured today were the injunctions on the three others and that against Hussain, from Tyseley.
A case against four other men, who cannot yet be named, continues.
Detective Chief Superintendent Danny Long, of the West Midlands Police Public Protection Unit, said similar measures may be used to tackle the 75 live cases of child exploitation currently being investigated in Birmingham.
He added: 'The injunctions give us the power to help to protect young people without putting them at the heart of a judicial process.
'Being found in a hotel room with a child is not a crime. Having a number of a child is not a crime. Sharing a taxi with a child is not a crime.
'But these men will not be allowed to do that.'

COUNCIL: THIS IS AN INNOVATIVE NEW WAY TO STOP GROOMING 

After the hearing, Peter Hay, Director of People at Birmingham City Council, said: 'Although there is not enough evidence for a criminal conviction at present, we do have enough information to obtain injunctions - these use a lower evidence threshold and the balance of probability.
'This is a ground-breaking approach, finding new ways to protect victims.
'We have to recognise that previous ways of dealing with this have not always worked.
'Too often the victim has not seen herself as a victim so it has been difficult to use the conventional criminal prosecution route.
Safeguarding: A lawyer representing Birmingham City Council (pictured) told Mr Justice Keehan how bosses had launched civil court proceedings against a number of men with the aim of protecting the young
Safeguarding: A lawyer representing Birmingham City Council (pictured) told Mr Justice Keehan how bosses had launched civil court proceedings against a number of men with the aim of protecting the young
'Because perpetrators befriend their victims and make them feel special it is therefore harder to gather concrete evidence to use against them. 
'We have used intelligence gathered by both agencies as well as evidence of perpetrators' criminal activities.
'This doesn't replace the criminal process but it is about finding complementary ways of working together to do all we can to safeguard vulnerable children.
'The young woman in question comes from a large family and has been known to Birmingham social services for a number of years.
'She is a bright young woman who cares deeply about her family, especially her siblings. 
'We strongly believe that she is being consistently sexually exploited and has been since her early teenage years.
'Every time she goes missing a police investigation is launched. She has been found in hotel rooms with men in states of undress and in a state of intoxication, despite lack of funds.
'Despite many attempts to work with her to understand the risks she was placing herself in, she continued to have contact with these men.
'She is now safe, in secure accommodation for her own protection.'

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Here am de Britun First !!!








Some of European culture at it's finest...............

Foreign terrorists and how bloodshed on an East London street, 100 years ago this week, has chilling parallels with Britain today


There was a high wind blowing through East London that ­December night in 1910. Along Houndsditch, the shops had shut and most of the area’s Jewish population were at home ­preparing for the Sabbath. But their peace would soon be shattered.
The street was about to explode into a scene of violence that would leave three policemen dead and two crippled for life.
It would bring to light the ruthless activities of gangs of foreign extremists that operated in London, using brutality and terror to bankroll their revolutionary crusades.
Open fire: The Siege of Sidney Street which happened in early 1911, two weeks after three policemen were shot dead and two more crippled for life in Houndsditch, City of London.
Open fire: The Siege of Sidney Street which happened in early 1911, two weeks after three policemen were shot dead and two more crippled for life in Houndsditch, City of London
The blood-stained events, 100 years ago this week, have eerie parallels with a Britain today that has become a hotbed of terror and radicalisation — as the story of Luton-based Islamist suicide bomber Taimour Abdulwahab al-Abdaly, who blew himself up in Sweden last Saturday, demonstrates so vividly.
At 10pm that December night, a shopkeeper who lived in the flat above his luxury goods shop on Houndsditch heard strange noises coming from downstairs. Fearing a break-in at the jeweller’s next door, he went to alert nearby policeman Walter Piper. He fetched two further constables, Walter Choate and Ernest Woodhams, from a nearby beat.
They were then joined by three sergeants — Bentley, Tucker and Bryant — as well as two plainclothes constables.
At 11.30pm, Bentley approached the house that backed on to the jeweller’s — No 11 Exchange Buildings.
A man with brown hair and a dapper little moustache opened the door. When Bentley asked him what he’d been doing, he didn’t reply, pretending not to understand.
Remembered: The three policemen killed (from left to right) Sergeant Robert Bentley, 36, Sergeant Charles Tucker, 46, and Pc Walter Charles Choat, 34,
Remembered: The three policemen killed (from left to right) Sergeant Robert Bentley, 36, Sergeant Charles Tucker, 46, and Pc Walter Charles Choat, 34
What the policeman did not know was that he had stumbled across a cell of foreign anarchists — individuals intent on using Britain as a base to foment revolution back in their home ­countries, and who would stop at nothing for their cause.
Just as today, Britain operated a liberal, open-door policy towards immigrants. And London had become a magnet for those fleeing persecution in their homeland. Most came to work in the sweatshops of the East End, sending money back to help their families.
But others had no interest in settling peacefully. Britain’s tolerant laws meant that they could operate freely in a way that would have seen them imprisoned, tortured or killed in their home countries — and to finance their revolutionary activities, they resorted to crime and violence,
Armed with guns brought in from abroad, they held up banks, shops and factories, bringing terror to the streets of the very country that had given them shelter.
When he approached No 11, Bentley had no idea of the terror that was about to be unleashed. He asked the mouse-haired foreigner he encountered to fetch someone who spoke English. The man disappeared back into the house, leaving the door ajar.
But he didn’t come back — so after waiting on the doorstep for a few minutes, Bentley went inside, followed by his colleague Sgt Bryant.
It was dark inside. Neither policemen was armed, it being extremely rare for a policeman to carry a firearm in 1910, even though criminals were increasingly doing so.

Anniversary: The newly unveiled plaque in Cutler Street commemorating the incident on December 16, 1910
Anniversary: The newly unveiled plaque in Cutler Street commemorating the incident on December 16, 1910
Only the year before in London, seven policemen had been wounded and two bystanders killed by two Latvian gunmen carrying out an armed robbery. Both robbers had died in the ensuing gun battle.
Though Bentley and Bryant did not know it, the men into whose lair they had just walked were compatriots of the dead robbers.
And they were every bit as ruthless and dedicated to their cause: revolution in Latvia — a satellite state of Russia — and the overthrow of the repressive Tsarist regime.
The Latvian gang had been planning this raid for weeks, renting the buildings behind the jeweller’s and purchasing implements and chemicals used for cutting metal (to break open the safe), and a drill to break through the wall behind it.
It was the noise of the drilling and the falling masonry that had alerted the neighbour.
The gang, whose brutal experiences in Latvia had left them with a deep distrust of the police, carried guns and were prepared to shoot their way out of trouble rather than be captured alive.
Several had been involved in a Latvian uprising five years earlier which had been brutally crushed, with 14,000 men, women and children massacred in reprisals by the Russian army. Ringleaders had been imprisoned and tortured by the police.
Not forgotten: Flowers are laid in December 1910 after three police officers were shot dead. It remains the joint worst attack on serving officers in British history
Not forgotten: Flowers are laid in December 1910 after three police officers were shot dead. It remains the joint worst attack on serving officers in British history

One, Jacob Peters, a Bolshevik, had his fingernails ripped out under interrogation. Another of his comrades had his genitals ripped off.
Peters was the man now inside No 11 Exchange Buildings, along with George Gardstein, the man who had opened the door to the police, and Gardstein’s mistress, Nina Vassilleva.
Two other members of the gang, Joseph and Fritz Svaars, had stayed behind at nearby lodgings with another veteran robber, Peter Piatkow, known as ‘Peter the Painter’ because he sometimes worked as a decorator.

HOW THE HOUNDSDITCH MURDERS HAPPENED

The Houndsditch murders took place after the anarchist gang broke into HS Harris jewellers planning to steal the contents of the safe.
A neighbour heard suspicious noises and alerted City of London Police, who sent officers to investigate, armed only with whistles and truncheons.
Sgt Bentley was shot dead after entering the house the burglars were using to gain access to the jewellers.
Fighting their way out of the building, the gang killed Sgt Tucker and Pc Choat. One of the burglars, George Gardstein, was accidentally shot by his friends in the melee and died from his wounds the next day.
The funeral for the murdered policemen, who were all posthumously awarded the King's Police

Medal, was held at St Paul's Cathedral on December 22 1910 and attended by then-home secretary Winston Churchill and the Lord Mayor of London.
As the policemen waited in the darkness of No 11 for Gardstein to return, they realised they were being watched from the stairs.
They could not see the man’s face, but asked him politely if they could look out of the back.
The man pointed to a room to their right. ‘In there,’ he said.

As Bentley stepped into the room, the back door of the house was flung open and another man, later identified as Jacob Peters, came towards him firing a pistol while the man on the stairs, whom it transpired was Gardstein, also opened fire with a long-barrelled Mauser gun.
Bentley was hit in the shoulder and the neck. His spinal cord was almost severed, but he managed to stagger back to the front door and collapse half into the street.
Sgt Bryant, ­standing behind him, was shot in the arm and chest, falling over the dying Bentley into the street.
He managed to stumble out of the cul-de-sac and slumped against the wall of a house.
As the anarchist Gardstein continued firing from the doorway, Peters dashed out to clear the street of policemen so that they could escape.
Despite the bullets whizzing through the darkness, PC Woodhams ran forward to help Bentley but was shot in the leg by Peters and fell unconscious.
Sgt Tucker was hit in the hip and the heart. He staggered to the end of the cul-de-sac and collapsed, dead.
Nina Vassilleva, who had been waiting in an upstairs room as lookout, now ran into the street after her lover, Gardstein. He had almost reached the end of the street when Constable Choate, a gentle giant of a man, stepped forward, courageously grasped him by the wrist and tried to wrestle his gun from him.
Gardstein fired repeatedly, hitting PC Choate in the leg, but the constable bravely held on, pushing the pistol away from him.
Choate was hit in the thigh, calf and foot but, despite his injuries, he ­managed to drag Gardstein down and the two men struggled on the ground.Then Peters, running forward with his pistol, shot Choate twice in the spine, forcing him to release his grip on Gardstein.
Jacobs the killer
Peter the painter
Desperate men: Killer Jacob Peters, left, the ruthless revolutionary and Peter the painter who was never caught
Scene of the crime: Houndsditch, City of London, where the three police officers were shot dead on December 16, 1910
A modern day view of Cutler Street in London, close to where the shooting took place
Scene of the crime: Houndsditch, City of London, where the three police officers were shot dead and as the area appears today
The anarchists made their escape. Peters dragged the wounded Gardstein out of the cul-de-sac, with ­Vassilleva following behind.
They managed to drag Gardstein back to the lodgings of their accomplice Fritz, where they laid him on a bed as he writhed in agony.
A doctor was fetched but could do little as Gardstein refused to go to hospital. He died a few hours later.
Meanwhile, the wounded policemen were being rushed to hospital. Sgt Tucker was found to be dead on arrival. Constable Choate, still conscious despite eight bullet wounds, was operated on, but died at 5.20am.
Sgt Bentley was carried to St Bartholomew’s Hospital. The bullet in his spine had paralysed his lower body. He regained consciousness long enough to answer questions and speak to his pregnant wife, before dying that evening.
In all, 22 shots had been fired outside No 11.
The three dead policemen were given a state funeral in St Paul’s Cathedral one week later, which was attended by dignitaries including the Lord Mayor of London and the Home Secretary, Winston Churchill. Thousands lined the route of the procession to pay their respects. Sgt Bryant and Constable Woodhams were disabled for life.
The doctor who had attended Gardstein informed police of this bleeding man who refused to go to hospital. But by the time they reached him, he was already dead. They found underneath the mattress a loaded pistol and several rounds of ammunition.
Assuming that the gun belonged to Gardstein, they blamed him for the murders, as the bullets that had killed the policemen matched those in the gun. But — as crime historian Donald Rumbelow reveals in his book on the Houndsditch Murders — it had in fact been stuffed under the mattress by Jacob Peters.
Under orders: Scots Guards awaiting the command to fire during the siege of Sidney Street in 1911.
Under orders: Scots Guards awaiting the command to fire during the siege of Sidney Street in 1911
Under oath: Sir Winston Churchill pictured in the witness box during the Sidney Street inquest in 1911. The future Prime Minister was present at the siege and reports suggested a bullet went straight through his hat. Historians have dismissed the story
Under oath: Sir Winston Churchill pictured in the witness box during the Sidney Street inquest in 1911. The future Prime Minister was present at the siege and reports suggested a bullet went straight through his hat. Historians have dismissed the story
It was Peters who had fired the fatal shots, but had seen the opportunity to pin the blame onto the dying ­Gardstein before fleeing to another lodging to lie low.
The Houndsditch Murders created a huge wave of public revulsion and horror. The police were under enormous pressure to catch the murderers, while the public blamed the ­Liberal government for allowing immigration to go unchecked and extremists to flourish unsupervised.
As Clive Bettington, head of the ­Jewish East End Celebration ­Society that has helped fund a new exhibition on the murders, points out: ‘There’s a resonance with today’s situation. These people were allowed into the country, in huge numbers, and no one knew who they were and what they were doing. No one checked up on them.
‘They took advantage of our liberal, tolerant attitude to carry out what were essentially acts of terrorism to further their own ends.’
Within days, the police had managed to round up Nina Vassilleva and Jacob Peters, although he denied any involvement.
Peter the Painter, identified by an informant as one of the gang, ­managed to flee the country a week after the killings.
Meanwhile, another informant tipped off police that two of the fellow anarchists — Fritz and Joseph Svaars — were hiding out at a house in Sidney Street, Stepney. In the early hours of January 3, 1911, 200 police officers surrounded the house and a six-hour gun battle ensued.
Winston Churchill arrived to observe the battle scene and when the men inside set fire to the house to cover their exit, he refused to allow the fire brigade to put the flames out.
When firemen finally entered the building, two charred bodies were found and identified as Fritz and Joseph Svaars. One fireman was killed by falling debris.
Incredibly, the two gang members brought to trial, Vassilleva and Peters, were subsequently acquitted through lack of evidence.
Not forgotten: The new plaque is in honour of the three officers who were shot dead and two others crippled for life by a gang of eastern European anarchists on this day 100 years ago
Not forgotten: The new plaque is in honour of the three officers who were shot dead and two others crippled for life by a gang of eastern European anarchists on this day 100 years ago
Three of the main witnesses were dead, and much of the evidence from that dark, confused night was deemed unreliable.
As the Daily Mail commented after the trial, five months after the policemen’s murders: ‘Not a single one of their murderers has been punished by the law.’ Two of the anarchists had died at Sidney Street, but the rest had either escaped or been freed.
Jacob Peters, the ruthless revolutionary who had fired the fatal shots that killed three unarmed men, remained in London.
In 1917, he returned to Russia following the revolution and became a leading member of the Bolshevik party and deputy head of the Cheka, the Soviet secret police.
Thousands of people were killed on his orders during the Cheka’s brutal reign of terror. Peters took pleasure in personally carrying out many of the death sentences on ‘enemies of the people’ himself, leading to his nickname of ‘The Executioner.’
Peter the Painter, whose colourful sobriquet had become synonymous with the killings, was never caught. In 2008, Tower Hamlets Community Housing named two houses after him, despite the protests of the Police Federation and Sgt Bentley’s family that they were ­glorifying the murders.
Yesterday, however, that injustice was somewhat rectified as City of London Police unveiled a plaque to the three murdered policemen in Cutler Street, into which the ­murderers fled after the shootout.
With extremism and foreign anarchists once more stalking London’s streets, abusing the tolerance for which this country has long been famous, it is a fitting moment to remember three policemen who died defending those freedoms.
  • The Museum of London Docklands exhibition on the Houndsditch Murders, London Under Siege opens tomorrow.
Huge crowd: Firefighters put out the blaze inside 100 Siege of Sidney. One fireman died in the incident
Huge crowd: Firefighters tackle the blaze during the Siege of Sidney Street. It broke out six hours into the siege, but Churchill refused them direct access, claiming he would wait for the criminals to flee. However the door never opened and two gang members, Fritz Svaars  and William Sokolow, perished

NWN: This article was posted 4 years ago. 
How apposite is it now ?

Sunday, November 09, 2014



WM


The Old Soldier

He was getting old and paunchy
And his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the Legion,
Telling stories of the past.

Of a war that he once fought in
And the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his buddies;
They were heroes, every one.

And 'tho sometimes to his neighbours
His tales became a joke,
All his buddies listened quietly
For they knew where of he spoke.

But we'll hear his tales no longer,
For ol' jimmy has passed away,
And the world's a little poorer
For a Soldier died today.

He won't be mourned by many,
Just his children and his wife.
For he lived an ordinary,
Very quiet sort of life.

He held a job and raised a family,
Going quietly on his way;
And the world won't note his passing,
'Tho a Soldier died today.

When politicians leave this earth,
Their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing,
And proclaim that they were great.

Papers tell of their life stories
From the time that they were young
But the passing of a Soldier
Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

Is the greatest contribution
To the welfare of our land,
Some jerk who breaks his promise
And cons his fellow man?

Or the ordinary fellow
Who in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his country
And offers up his life?

The politician's stipend
And the style in which he lives,
Are often disproportionate,
To the service that he gives.

While the ordinary Soldier,
Who offered up his all,
Is paid off with a medal
And perhaps a pension, small.

It is not the politicians/news reporter
With their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom
That our country now enjoys.

Should you find yourself in danger,
With your enemies at hand,
Would you really want some cop-out,
With his ever waffling stand?

Or would you want a Soldier--
His home, his country, his kin,
Just a common Soldier,
Who would fight until the end.

He was just a common Soldier,
And his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us
We may need his like again.

For when countries are in conflict,
We find the Soldier's part
Is to clean up all the troubles
That the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honour
While he's here to hear the praise,
Then at least let's give him homage
At the ending of his days.

Perhaps just a simple headline
In the paper that might say:
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,
A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

Saturday, November 08, 2014


Terrorists foiled in plot to kill Queen Elizabeth

Four Islamic terrorists planned to kill the Queen of England this weekend — but British police foiled the assassination plot, reports said.
The anarchist assassins intended to stab Queen Elizabeth II Friday as the country celebrated 96 years since the end of World War I — an annual British jubilee — with numerous public appearances by her Royal Highness.
British police discovered the murder plot by the four terrorists, ranging in age from 19 to 27, and conducted multiple raids in West London and Buckinghamshire to thwart their plan.
Cops believe the suspected terrorists planned to use a knife to kill the beloved 88-year-old Queen, but also think they likely had access to firearms.
Officials made Queen Elizabeth and Prime Minister David Cameron aware of the potential threat, but her Royal Highness still plans to attend the weekend’s festivities.
She was expected at Saturday’s annual Royal British Legion Festival, a military bash that celebrates the end of World War I, The Sun first reported.
Her Majesty is still slated to lay the first wreath at Sunday Remembrance celebration following a two-minute moment of silence, according to The Sun.
This is not the first time the Queen’s life has been threatened.
The Lithgow Plot was an assassination attempt on the Queen and her husband, Philip, who were on a royal tour in Australia.
The lovebirds were traveling from Sydney to Orange in 1970 when their train struck a large wooden log, that was allegedly placed on the tracks in hopes of causing the train to derail as it came barreling full speed down the track.
But, for some reason, the train was traveling at an unusually slow speed, averting any crisis and sparring their lives.
The royal couple was reportedly kept in the dark about the 1970s murder plot to avoid embarrassment for the Australian government, The Daily Mail reported.
She has reigned Queen for more than five decades, assuming the title at age 25. Prince Charles, her oldest son, is next in line to the throne, but is expected to pass the honor to his son, William.
The Duke of Cambridge and his wife, Kate Middleton, welcomed a son to the royal family last July and are expecting another child in April.

http://nypost.com/2014/11/07/plot-to-assassinate-queen-elizabeth-thwarted-by-bobbies/

It is also coming from New Zealand, but they say it was a muslim conspiracy to commit murder;

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/63032523/queen-elizabeth-murder-plot-foiled.html

NWN: This story doesn't seem to be being mentioned much on UK news outlets. 

There is some info here;

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2825277/Four-Islamic-terror-plot-suspects-arrested-west-London-Home-Counties.html 

Irish international football player James McClean writes passionate open letter explaining his refusal to wear a shirt with poppy in Wigan game as he is abused online for his stance

  • James McClean refused to wear a poppy during Wigan's game last night 
  • The Derry-born footballer wrote to his chairman to explain his decision 
  • He said he had 'complete respect' for those who died in both World Wars
  • McClean said the poppy also represented those lost in other conflicts since
  • He said he could not wear one because of the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre
  • McClean was booed when he touched the ball last night in Bolton 
  • He also received threats, abuse and support on Twitter over his decision
Republic of Ireland international James McClean has written a passionate open letter to Wigan fans to explain his decision to not wear a poppy during last night's game against Bolton Wanderers.  
Derry born McClean said if the poppy only represented those who fought in the two world wars, he would have no problem wearing one. However, he said, as the poppy also represents those who have fought since 1945 - including during the Northern Ireland conflict, he could not wear one.
McClean said he would be showing 'disrespect' to the victims of the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre in Derry if he wore one. His stance, opened him up to significant abuse on social media.  
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Republic of Ireland International James McClean, centre, wrote a letter to Wigan Club chairman Dave Whelan explaining the reasons why he was unable to wear a poppy-embroidered shirt during last night's match 
Republic of Ireland International James McClean, centre, wrote a letter to Wigan Club chairman Dave Whelan explaining the reasons why he was unable to wear a poppy-embroidered shirt during last night's match 
McClean defended his decision claiming that wearing a poppy would be a sign of disrespect for the innocent victims of the troubles such as those killed by British Troops on Bloody Sunday in January 1972, pictured
McClean defended his decision claiming that wearing a poppy would be a sign of disrespect for the innocent victims of the troubles such as those killed by British Troops on Bloody Sunday in January 1972, pictured
McClean played for Wigan last night during the team's 3-1 defeat to Bolton Wanderers. 
Bolton fans regularly booed the Republic of Ireland international each time he touched the ball during last night's encounter. 
The player met with Wigan chairman Dave Whelan, whose grandfather from County Tipperary, fought in the First World War, to explain the situation.  
Last night, the club’s official website published a letter from McClean to Whelan in which the winger, who was named among the substitutes, explained his stance and denied being anti-British.
In that letter, McClean said he had great respect for those that fought and died in both World Wars, however, he had a great problem with the poppy representing those killed in conflicts since 1945. 
In particular, McClean said that as someone born in Derry, he could not support the poppy appeal. 
James McClean, left, faced abuse in November 2012 when as a Sunderland player he again refused to wear a poppy, although fellow Republic of Ireland international Seamus Coleman, right wore one playing for Everton
James McClean, left, faced abuse in November 2012 when as a Sunderland player he again refused to wear a poppy, although fellow Republic of Ireland international Seamus Coleman, right wore one playing for Everton
He cited the January 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre where 13 civil rights demonstrators were shot dead by British troops.
He said: ' For people from the North of Ireland such as myself, and specifically those in Derry, scene of the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre, the poppy has come to mean something very different.'
He said that after those events it would be 'an act of disrespect' to those people.  
McClean had previously refused to wear poppy earlier in his career while playing for Sunderland. 
Police in Sunderland investigated death threats made against the winger after he appeared as a substitute against Everton in November 2012 without wearing a poppy. 
Some of the more extreme elements on Twitter wanted McClean to 'drop dead' or to suffer a major injury
Some of the more extreme elements on Twitter wanted McClean to 'drop dead' or to suffer a major injury
Twitter users were divided on their opinions on whether James McClean had made the correct decision
Twitter users were divided on their opinions on whether James McClean had made the correct decision
The statement was welcomed by many people on social media, some of whom praised McClean for having ‘the courage of his convictions’ but said it was ‘sad that it’s come to the stage he’s had to even explain himself’.
Others were more scathing of the footballer’s decision and Jon Jenner wrote on Twitter: ‘James McClean shouldn’t be allowed to play in England nothing but scum [sic]’ while another wrote: ‘Statement regarding James McClean…Utterly Disgraceful Behaviour. Disgusting Individual. 
Early in his career, McClean played international football at youth level for Northern Ireland until he reached the Under 21s.  
In February 2012, McClean received clearance from FIFA to switch over to the Republic of Ireland international squad, which led to him also receiving abuse. 
After McClean was called up for the Republic of Ireland squad for Euro 2012 and was abused by some Northern Ireland fans.
He was forced to 'retire' from Twitter after he responded to some of the abuse by telling Northern Ireland fans to watch their own team during the competition - knowing that they had not qualified. 
Two years ago, former British soldier Cody Lachey posted pictures of bullets on McClean's Twitter timeline. One of the tweets said: ''he deserves to be shot dead + body dragged past the cenotaph!!' 
Other users on Twitter expressed support for McClean's decision or his right not to wear a wear a poppy
Other users on Twitter expressed support for McClean's decision or his right not to wear a wear a poppy

FULL TEXT OF THE WINGER'S LETTER TO WIGAN CHAIRMAN DAVE WHELAN 

Dear Mr Whelan
I wanted to write to you before talking about this face to face and explain my reasons for not wearing a poppy on my shirt for the game at Bolton.
I have complete respect for those who fought and died in both World Wars - many I know were Irish-born. I have been told that your own Grandfather Paddy Whelan, from Tipperary, was one of those.
I mourn their deaths like every other decent person and if the Poppy was a symbol only for the lost souls of World War I and II I would wear one.
I want to make that 100% clear .You must understand this.
But the Poppy is used to remember victims of other conflicts since 1945 and this is where the problem starts for me.
For people from the North of Ireland such as myself, and specifically those in Derry, scene of the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre, the poppy has come to mean something very different. Please understand, Mr Whelan, that when you come from Creggan like myself or the Bogside, Brandywell or the majority of places in Derry, every person still lives in the shadow of one of the darkest days in Ireland’s history – even if like me you were born nearly 20 years after the event. It is just a part of who we are, ingrained into us from birth.
Mr Whelan, for me to wear a poppy would be as much a gesture of disrespect for the innocent people who lost their lives in the Troubles – and Bloody Sunday especially - as I have in the past been accused of disrespecting the victims of WWI and WWII.
It would be seen as an act of disrespect to those people; to my people.
I am not a war monger, or anti-British, or a terrorist or any of the accusations levelled at me in the past. I am a peaceful guy, I believe everyone should live side by side, whatever their religious or political beliefs which I respect and ask for people to respect mine in return. Since last year, I am a father and I want my daughter to grow up in a peaceful world, like any parent.
I am very proud of where I come from and I just cannot do something that I believe is wrong. In life, if you’re a man you should stand up for what you believe in.
I know you may not agree with my feelings but I hope very much that you understand my reasons.
As the owner of the club I am proud to play for, I believe I owe both you and the club’s supporters this explanation.
Yours sincerely,
James McClean 

IRISH RELUCTANCE TO WEARING THE POPPY DATES BACK TO 1916

At the outbreak of the First World War, Ireland had been promised Home Rule by the British Government. 
Constitutional Irish Nationalists such as John Redmond urged Irish men to volunteer for the British Army, in the belief that after the conflict, they would be rewarded with self-government. 
More than 200,000 Irish men volunteered to serve. 
On April 21, 1916 Irish republicans attempted to land more than 20,000 rifles and one million rounds of ammunition from a German boat on the west coast of Ireland.
With the loss of the rifles, rebels from across the country were ordered to stand down, although in Dublin, the planned Easter Rising took place. 
Rebels seized several strategic points across Dublin City on Easter Monday, April 24.
Over the next week, more than 20,000 British solders were sent to face approximately 1,600 rebels. 
Dublin City Centre was destroyed under heavy bombardment, killing more than 200 civilians.  
Civilians in Derry take cover from British Army soldiers as Fr Edward Daly, left, waves a white handkerchief while trying to escort a wounded civilian to an ambulance for emergency treatment 
Civilians in Derry take cover from British Army soldiers as Fr Edward Daly, left, waves a white handkerchief while trying to escort a wounded civilian to an ambulance for emergency treatment 
At the time of the rising, public sentiment, especially in Dublin was against the rebels. However, when the British government decided to execute 16 of the leaders of the rebellion, this turned public opinion - increasing popular support for what would become the Irish War of Independence. 
During the War of Independence 1919-1921, the British government deployed the paramilitary Black and Tans to quell the uprising using brutal methods - regularly burning the homes of suspected rebels and murdering innocent civilians. 
As a result of this, Irish men who served in the British Army during the First World War were reluctant to reveal this publicly. 
During the Second World War, again thousands of Irish volunteered to serve with British forces. 
Although with 'The Troubles' in Northern Ireland, British troops - especially the Parachute Regiment - were accused of civil rights abuses, such as the Bloody Sunday massacre of January 1972. 
In recent years, the Irish Government has officially recognised the sacrifice of Irish men who volunteered to serve with British forces during the two world wars - culminating in the visit of Queen Elizabeth II in Dublin in May 2011. 
Symbolically, Queen Elizabeth laid wreaths at both the Garden of Remembrance in Dublin to commemorate those who fought for Irish freedom, and a second at the war memorial in Islandbridge in which remembers Irish men who fought for Britain. 

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Is this the end of the National Front?

Kevin Bryan addressing a National Front meeting: he leads the largest NF faction but must now make a tough strategic decision.
After well over a year of pondering the Electoral Commission has finally come to a decision on the future of the National Front: as of last Friday the NF ceased to exist as a political party, having been officially deregistered by the Commission, which regulates all UK political parties.
Two different factions were pushing their case to be recognized by the Electoral Commission as the “Official” NF. The largest mainly northern based faction was led by Kevin Bryan and Chris Jackson. The smaller, mainly southern based faction was led by Ian Edward and Bernadette Jaggers.
Mr Edward was still recognized by the Electoral Commission as the NF’s official nominating officer, who must by law approve any candidate wishing to have the party name on a ballot paper. So he managed to stop all but a couple of the rival Bryan faction standing in elections as NF candidates over the past year.
Ian Edward (left) was officially recognised by the Electoral Commission as NF chairman and nominating officer, until the party was deregistered last Friday.
This meant a real opportunity was missed in Heywood & Middleton, a constituency which forms part of the borough of Rochdale – one of several northern towns where nationalists have for years campaigned against the sexual abuse of local children by Asian men. This issue has at long last become a nationwide scandal, and the National Front has an active local branch and a credible potential candidate – Peter Greenwood, who had polled 7% for the BNP in this same constituency four years ago. Yet there was no NF candidate at the Heywood & Middleton by-election on October 9th (which followed the sudden death of the area’s Labour MP). This was due to: a) the continuing inability of the Bryan faction in the NF to convince the Electoral Commission, that they in fact were the legal/official NF, and b) that the party’s official nominating officer Ian Edward, blocked them from standing.
However, all this has now been resolved and the Electoral Commission has finally made a decision.
On October 31st, the Electoral Commission officially deregistered the National Front as a legal political party. The official reason they gave was that neither NF faction had submitted any financial accounts for the tax year ending April 2014. However, it is understood from a source inside the EC that they just got sick and tied of both NF factions demanding they “declare them the official NF”. So they just closed the party down.
What does this mean for both NF factions and their members?
They of course can carry on as a political movement (rather than party) pretty much as the British Movement and others have been doing for many years. They just would not be able to stand in elections under the name “National Front”.
This would be welcomed by some in the Bryan faction, including Eddy Morrison and Mike Easter, who have long wanted to get away from electoral politics and return to mainly street based activities. However, there are others such as Richard Edmonds and Tess Culnane who are more in favour of electoral politics and so may not be so happy.
It is understood that some in the Edward NF faction are already in talks with the British Democratic Party (BDP) about coming over to them.
Former BNP chairman Nick Griffin (far right) getting friendly with NF demonstrators in Bolton earlier this year: until recently he dismissed the NF as “pathetic”.
Meanwhile some in the Bryan NF faction have been having talks with Nick Griffin for some weeks now about joining his new organization, if they failed to take back the NF – which is now the case.  Since his expulsion from the BNP, Griffin has made increasingly radical noises and (like some in the NF) now seems more focused on street politics than elections. His pitch might appeal to some of the younger NF activists, but most older party officials (on either side) are longstanding factional enemies of the former BNP chairman.
Both NF factions are having Remembrance Day parades in London on Sunday 9th November (one after the other, as the Police aim to keep the two sides apart). It will be interesting to hear from members on both sides what they think of this latest development: after more than 45 years the National Front – once arguably the most successful white nationalist party in the world – no longer exists as a political party.
http://efp.org.uk/is-this-the-end-of-the-national-front/

Monday, November 03, 2014

Army Cadet blasted in face with makeshift blowtorch after selling poppies in Manchester city centre

The 15-year-old, who was wearing his camouflaged uniform, suffered burns when a man attacked him with an aerosol can and a lighter near Manchester Art Gallery.

The Cadet was waiting at a bus stop next to Manchester Art Gallery when he was attacked
An Army Cadet suffered burns to his face after being blasted with a makeshift blowtorch as he returned home from selling poppies for Remembrance Day.
The 15-year-old, who was wearing his camouflaged uniform, was waiting at a bus stop next to Manchester Art Gallery, opposite George Street in Manchester, when a man approached him with an aerosol can and a lighter.
The attacker used the items to make a makeshift blowtorch and sprayed lit fumes at the Cadet, who had spent the day in the city centre selling poppies and collecting money to commemorate Armistice Day.
UPDATE: Manchester MP 'appalled and disgusted' by DIY blowtorch attack on Army Cadet selling poppies in city centre
UPDATE: Royal British Legion condemns 'flamethrower' attack on teen selling poppies in Manchester
The teenager, who had been looking down Princess Street at the time of the unprovoked attack, suffered minor reddening to his face and singed hairs on his face and right forearm.
The offender, who walked off without saying a word, is described as being black or Asian, 5ft 8in and wearing a dark hooded top. He appeared to be under the influence of alcohol and was staggering, police said.
Detectives are ‘keeping an open mind’ about the motive of the attack, which happened yesterday at 6pm.
They have appealed for anyone with information to come forward.
Det Insp Liam Boden said: “This is an absolutely appalling attack on a young man who was raising money to help remember all those who gave their lives fighting bravely for their country.
“At this stage of our inquiries, we’re keeping an open mind as to what motivated the offender to commit such an act.
“Given the initial description we have of the offender, it may be that he was under the influence of something but whatever his motivation, his violent actions could have scarred this young man for life.
“Although he has suffered some minor injuries, it is pure luck that he did not sustain more serious burns to his face and body."
Det Insp Liam Boden added that the Cadet and his family were in ‘total shock’ and could not believe anyone would do such a thing.
He said: “We need to find whomever is responsible for this crime and I would therefore appeal to anyone who has information that could help.
“This happened at a very busy time in the city centre, near a main bus route, and there could be lots of people who saw this man staggering around.“If you do have information then please come forward.”
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/army-cadet-blasted-face-makeshift-8035451


1914 - 2014 

Wipers............YPRES  
'Hellfire Corner' 1917
 

40 years ago - 13th August 1977 - Lewisham National Front march..............the day the 'balloon went up'. Lewisham 19...